Ramblings of an Impatient Mystic

GUYS THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT PLEASE DON’T SCROLL PAST IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

flange5:

jenovas—witness:

furbearingbrick:

ereriislife15:

I’m doing a persuasive speech and this would really help me out.

If you think animals should be adopted from shelters, reblog.

If you think animals should be bought from pet stores, like.

*REBLOGS FURIOUSLY*

always adopt - you will be saving some poor animals life, will know what their temperament is like AND cut down on people over breeding animals with the sole purpose of making money.

(Source: the-martyr-from-gloria, via patrondebris)

orphanspace:

Saints Clare, Francis, and Bernardino British Library MS Stowe 23. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

orphanspace:

Saints Clare, Francis, and Bernardino

British Library MS Stowe 23. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

(Source: jothelibrarian)

Answers to the Christian Questions will be forthcoming. However, dilly beans, raspberry freezer jam, cooked raspberry jam, and the dish drainer must come first…

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Crew Member of the Enola Gay
The Enola Gay* was 31,000 feet above Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 at 8:15 a.m. when it released its payload - “Little Boy,” the first atomic bomb. After dropping the bomb, the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, turned the plane and headed back to base in the Mariana Islands.
The crew was told that they had 43 seconds to leave the area before the bomb detonated 1,890 feet in the air over the city of 350,000. Navigator Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk began counting in his head (“one one-thousand”, “two one-thousand”) and at 43 there was nothing. He and his crew mates thought it was dud. 
Then the cabin filled with a bright light and the "plane jumped and made a sound like sheet metal snapping." Looking back he saw that Hiroshima was no longer visible, "The entire city was covered with smoke and dust and dirt. I describe it looking like a pot of black, boiling tar. You could see some fires burning on the edge of the city.”
Chosen as a military target housing several divisions of the Japanese army as well as serving as a key shipping port, an estimated 70-80,000 residents of Hiroshima were killed by the blast or resultant fires. Another 70,000 men, women, and children were injured. (Thousands later died of radiation poisoning or radiation-related illnesses.) 
Three days later another plane dropped a second atomic bomb (“Fat Man”)  on the city of Nagasaki. The Japanese surrendered that same day. (The official surrender occured on September 1, 1945.)
Mr. Van Kirk joined the Army Air Corps cadet program (a precursor to the U.S. Air Force Academy) just two months before the Japanese bombing at Pearl Harbor. Following his training, he was recruited by Colonel Tibbets as navigator, along with Major Thomas Ferebee as bombadier. 
Together the threesome flew 58 missions during World War II. This included transporting General Dwight Eisenhower to Gibraltar in 1942 for the planning of the Allied invasion of North Africa.
Mr. Van Kirk was reassigned stateside as a training officer after mission 58 but Colonel Tibbets recalled him as part of the newly created 509th Composite Group. The group was formed to specifically handle the transport and delivery of the atomic bomb.
Mr. Van Kirk, and the 12-man crew of the Enola Gay, would train for six months before deing deployed to Hiroshima. The flight was nine hours from the base at Tinian on the Marianas and Mr. Van Kirk’s navigation (using a compass, map, and sextant) had them arrive at the target only 15 seconds behind schedule.
During his servince in the Army Air Corps Mr. Van Kirk reached the rank of major and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and a Silver Star. But he kept his most historic flight quiet, not even telling his children until they discovered newspaper clippings in his mother’s attic.
Following the war Mr. Van Kirk attended Bucknell University and worked as a chemical engineer at DuPont.
He did not regret dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. He, like many of his generation, believed that a coming land invasion of Japan by Allied forces would have killed many thousands more. “I honestly believe the use of the atomic bomb saved lives in the long run. There were a lot of lives saved. Most of the lives saved were Japanese.”
When asked about the moral implications of dropping the bomb, Mr. Van Kirk answered, “Where was the morality in the bombing of Coventry, or the bombing of Dresden, or the Bataan Death March, or the Rape of Nanking, or the bombing of Pearl Harbor? I believe that when you’re in a war, a nation must have the courage to do what it must to win the war with a minimum loss of lives.”
Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, who was retirement home neighbors with one of the last living crewman of the USS Missouri where the Japanese army officially surrendered, died on July 28, 2014 at the age of 93.
Sources: NY Times, AJC.com, Mental Floss, and Wikipedia
(Image of then-Captain Theodore Van Kirk, Colonel “Birdie” Tibbets, and Major Thomas Ferebee standing next to the Enola Gay in 1945 following their mission to Hiroshima. U.S. Air Force, via Agence France-Press — Getty Images, via The New York Times)
* The plane was named for the pilor, Colonel Paul Tibbets’ mother, Enola Gay.
Other relevant Obit of the Day posts:
Nathan Safferstein - Autographed the atomic bomb
Senji Yamaguchi - Survivor of the Nagasaki bomb who became a voice for disarmament

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Crew Member of the Enola Gay

The Enola Gay* was 31,000 feet above Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 at 8:15 a.m. when it released its payload - “Little Boy,” the first atomic bomb. After dropping the bomb, the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets, turned the plane and headed back to base in the Mariana Islands.

The crew was told that they had 43 seconds to leave the area before the bomb detonated 1,890 feet in the air over the city of 350,000. Navigator Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk began counting in his head (“one one-thousand”, “two one-thousand”) and at 43 there was nothing. He and his crew mates thought it was dud. 

Then the cabin filled with a bright light and the "plane jumped and made a sound like sheet metal snapping." Looking back he saw that Hiroshima was no longer visible, "The entire city was covered with smoke and dust and dirt. I describe it looking like a pot of black, boiling tar. You could see some fires burning on the edge of the city.”

Chosen as a military target housing several divisions of the Japanese army as well as serving as a key shipping port, an estimated 70-80,000 residents of Hiroshima were killed by the blast or resultant fires. Another 70,000 men, women, and children were injured. (Thousands later died of radiation poisoning or radiation-related illnesses.) 

Three days later another plane dropped a second atomic bomb (“Fat Man”)  on the city of Nagasaki. The Japanese surrendered that same day. (The official surrender occured on September 1, 1945.)

Mr. Van Kirk joined the Army Air Corps cadet program (a precursor to the U.S. Air Force Academy) just two months before the Japanese bombing at Pearl Harbor. Following his training, he was recruited by Colonel Tibbets as navigator, along with Major Thomas Ferebee as bombadier. 

Together the threesome flew 58 missions during World War II. This included transporting General Dwight Eisenhower to Gibraltar in 1942 for the planning of the Allied invasion of North Africa.

Mr. Van Kirk was reassigned stateside as a training officer after mission 58 but Colonel Tibbets recalled him as part of the newly created 509th Composite Group. The group was formed to specifically handle the transport and delivery of the atomic bomb.

Mr. Van Kirk, and the 12-man crew of the Enola Gay, would train for six months before deing deployed to Hiroshima. The flight was nine hours from the base at Tinian on the Marianas and Mr. Van Kirk’s navigation (using a compass, map, and sextant) had them arrive at the target only 15 seconds behind schedule.

During his servince in the Army Air Corps Mr. Van Kirk reached the rank of major and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and a Silver Star. But he kept his most historic flight quiet, not even telling his children until they discovered newspaper clippings in his mother’s attic.

Following the war Mr. Van Kirk attended Bucknell University and worked as a chemical engineer at DuPont.

He did not regret dropping the bomb on Hiroshima. He, like many of his generation, believed that a coming land invasion of Japan by Allied forces would have killed many thousands more. “honestly believe the use of the atomic bomb saved lives in the long run. There were a lot of lives saved. Most of the lives saved were Japanese.”

When asked about the moral implications of dropping the bomb, Mr. Van Kirk answered, “Where was the morality in the bombing of Coventry, or the bombing of Dresden, or the Bataan Death March, or the Rape of Nanking, or the bombing of Pearl Harbor? I believe that when you’re in a war, a nation must have the courage to do what it must to win the war with a minimum loss of lives.”

Theodore “Dutch” Van Kirk, who was retirement home neighbors with one of the last living crewman of the USS Missouri where the Japanese army officially surrendered, died on July 28, 2014 at the age of 93.

Sources: NY Times, AJC.com, Mental Floss, and Wikipedia

(Image of then-Captain Theodore Van Kirk, Colonel “Birdie” Tibbets, and Major Thomas Ferebee standing next to the Enola Gay in 1945 following their mission to Hiroshima. U.S. Air Force, via Agence France-Press — Getty Images, via The New York Times)

* The plane was named for the pilor, Colonel Paul Tibbets’ mother, Enola Gay.

Other relevant Obit of the Day posts:

Nathan Safferstein - Autographed the atomic bomb

Senji Yamaguchi - Survivor of the Nagasaki bomb who became a voice for disarmament

(via thecolemanempire)

centuriespast:

UNKNOWN MASTER, GermanSt John Resting on Jesus’ Chestc. 1320Walnut, 141 x 73 x 48 cmMuseum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerp

centuriespast:

UNKNOWN MASTER, German
St John Resting on Jesus’ Chest
c. 1320
Walnut, 141 x 73 x 48 cm
Museum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerp

italian-landscapes:

Basilica di S. Caterina d’Alessandria (St. Catherine of Alexandria Cathedral), Galatina, Puglia, Italy (XIV sec. - 14th C AC)

Google Maps

(via rudyscuriocabinet)

booklikes:

Which door do you choose?

booklikes:

Which door do you choose?

(Source: may.booklikes.com, via bibliophileanon)

politicalmachine:

he has been in congress for thirty years
he is on the house energy committee
and yes, of course, he is a republican
voting matters

politicalmachine:

he has been in congress for thirty years

he is on the house energy committee

and yes, of course, he is a republican

voting matters

(Source: memecenterz, via deosluxmea)

“I’m certain that God is much more concerned with the destruction of God’s creation, the exploitation of the poor, or the greed of those who already have more than enough rather than the gender of the person one loves or one’s own gender identity or expression thereof.”

Enrique Molina (via gaychristian)

Live, love, be!

(via ourspiritnow)

Don’t believe it?  Read the Bible, and not just the parts you like.

(via jepartrick)

(via baptistepiscopal)

jcassian:

"He is The Bread sown in the virgin, leavened in the Flesh, molded in His Passion, baked in the furnace of the Sepulchre, placed in the Churches, and set upon the Altars, which daily supplies Heavenly Food to the faithful."
- St. Peter Chrysologus (400-450)

jcassian:

"He is The Bread sown in the virgin, leavened in the Flesh, molded in His Passion, baked in the furnace of the Sepulchre, placed in the Churches, and set upon the Altars, which daily supplies Heavenly Food to the faithful."

- St. Peter Chrysologus (400-450)

(via christianwritings)

bewarethebibliophilia:

Illustrated parchment manuscript, 3 x 4”, Ethiopia, 20th c., from A Transcultural Mosaic: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Mingei International Museum. Visit this museum when in San Diego.

bewarethebibliophilia:

Illustrated parchment manuscript, 3 x 4”, Ethiopia, 20th c., from A Transcultural Mosaic: Selections from the Permanent Collection of Mingei International Museum. Visit this museum when in San Diego.

35 Christian Questions (ask away!)

1: What is your favorite book of the Bible and why?

2: Tell of a past event that has influenced your faith the most.

3: Who is your Christian role-model?

4: Who is your favorite Bible character?

5: What is your favorite Bible name?

6: If you were to participate in short-term mission trip, where would you like to go?

7: Favorite well-known Bible story?

8: Would you rather be shot for your faith (and die) or be tortured and live to tell of the experience?

9: What are your top three worship songs?

10: Your top three favorite Christian contemporary songs?

11: Are you a Proverbs 31 woman or a Job 29 man?

12: Who is your favorite current Christian speaker? (ex: Francis Chan, Beth Moore, etc.)

13: What is your favorite time of day to read the Bible?

14: In what ways has God blessed you recently?

15: Have you ever witnessed to someone? If so, would you do it again?

16: What is a prayer of yours that God has answered recently?

17: What do you feel God is really teaching you right now?

18: Any Fruit of the Spirit you know you could work on?

19: Do you enjoy going to church?

20: Which do you prefer; daily devotions or a daily Bible passage?

21: Ever read the Bible straight through?

22: What are some chapters in the Bible that you recommend to beginner Bible readers?

23: What are some chapters in the Bible that you recommend period?

24: When's the last time you went to church?

25: What is your favorite Christian holiday and why?

26: Favorite verse?

27: Name your top three favorite Christian bands, from any Christian genres.

28: Do you call Him [sic] the Holy Spirit or the Holy Ghost?

29: In the Lord's Prayer, do you say "forgive us our sins", "forgive us our debts", or "forgive us our transgressions"?

30: What is your favorite Bible Study/Sunday School moment?

31: Who, on tumblr, inspires your walk with Christ the most?

32: If you have one, what is the date of your rebirthday? (or anniversary of becoming a Christian)

33: Would you rather die and go to heaven or be on earth when Jesus comes again?

34: What is the best thing someone has done to encourage you spiritually?

35: Old-fashioned church services or contemporary church services?

therurrjurr:

Sainte Marthe et la Tarasque

therurrjurr:

Sainte Marthe et la Tarasque

(via verilyisayuntothee)